Worried About New Bush Wars?

By: S. Rowan Wolf of Uncommon Thought Journal

Are you worried about new fronts in the Bush wars? Iran and Syria for example? You are not alone – Senators fear Iraq war may spill to Iran, Syria. From the January 10th speech by George Bush, to the mobilization of the fleet to “warn” Iran, to the US raid on the Iranian consulate in Irbil, Iraq, it seems Bush’s intent is to provoke a response from Iran which could be used to legitimate a US attack.

I could not believe my eyes this morning when I was the news crawl stating that US troops had raided the Iranian consulate. Just when I think that the stupidity of the current administration has reached its peak, it comes out of right field with a whole new dumb move.

According to Iran News:

Tehran says five United States helicopters landed on the roof of the consulate in the northern city of Irbil.

It says American soldiers broke down the doors, detained five people and took away papers and computers.

Consulates are significant. They are the sovereign sites. By international agreement we have the sovereignty of consulates and embassies, and diplomatic immunity. The protection under which consulates operate are part of the 1963 Vienna Convention to which the US is a signatory.

I could not, and still can’t, figure out what purpose beyond provocation that such an action would be allowed to take place.

Here we have an Iranian consulate under the protection of the Kurdish Regional Government. The KRG is not only a significant part of the elected Iraqi government, but has from the beginning of this insanity been an allied area with the United States.

Then we have the effort to present the US forces in Iraq as “liberators” and “supporters” of the Iraqi government rather than as imperial occupiers which manipulate a puppet government in place to serve US interests. So US forces who are “guests” in another country take it upon themselves to invade the sovereign territory of a consulate.

Iran, however, is refusing to be provoked. The Mullahs of Iran lodged a protest of the raid with the ambassadors of Iraq and Switzerland in Iran. These ambassadors represent the US interests in Iran since the US has no embassy there and refuses to deal directly with Iran. Iran also appealed directly to the Iraqi government demanding they accomplish the release of the consulate officials captured during the raid. They also demanded the return of computers and papers that were confiscated by the US forces.

Interestingly, Iran seems to be framing the raid as an attempt by the US to “impair the good ties between Iran and Iraq.” (CNS)

If US Senators and groups such as Stratfor think the Bush crew is trying to set up a legitimation for either attack or invasion, then my concerns (and yours) have some foundation. Unless the Bush crew is in total na-na land, they have to be aware that the US armed forces are in no position to enter another major war. Therefore, they must still believe that “shock and awe” will force the world to bow before them.

Fools. Dangerous fools. Our fools.

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Published in: on 01/12/2007 at 7:39 pm  Comments (2)  

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Impeachment is the only way to end the non-stop lies, warmongering, ignorance, arrogance, corruption and incompetence of the fraudulent Bush administration.

  2. I have been worried about Iran for years. I want to post my worry here about another aspect of Iran’s social, religious and political life.
    ______________________
    On the BBC (Persian/Farsi) July 20th, 2007.
    _________________
    Translation: Formation of a Muslim Group in Defense of the Rights of Baha’is….Na’im Sobhani…BBC-Persian, Washington
    __________________
    For the 1st time on the internet, a group of Muslim youth has established a site called “the Muslim Network for Baha’i Rights.” This site closely monitors the conditions of Baha’is in Egypt and Iran. That a group of Muslims—made up of social activists and liberal students from Arab countries—has exposed the plight of Baha’is is seen as a significant development by human rights advocates.

    “The Muslim Network for Baha’i Rights” is not based in any specific country, nor does it have an office or staff. This internet group has made known its goal of attaining civil rights and basic freedoms for Baha’is in the Islamic and Arab worlds.

    On their website, they closely follow and discuss all the latest news on the Baha’is in the Islamic world. The founder of this internet project is Esra’a Shafei,a young woman from Bahrain.

    Esra’a states that she is a believing Muslim and has no connection with Baha’is. However, as a Muslim, she believes it is necessary to respect the rights of this religious minority. This Bahraini student added that she has purposefully named the group “Islamic” to attract the attention of Muslims.

    However, this step has stirred a great deal of debate. According to Esra’a, “They ask me why I am doing this? Why are you working against your own religious identity? They even accuse me of being a traitor and a Zionist. 70 percent of the reactions I have thus far received have been of this nature.”

    Esra’a, who is only 20 years old, adds that such reactions will not dissuade her. She states that she closely follows the condition of Baha’is in Iran and Egypt.

    It is believed that there are some 500 Baha’is in Egypt. In the 1960s, their religion was declared illegal by order of Jamal Abdul-Nasser, the former president of Egypt. Until this day, Baha’is are considered “apostates” in Egypt.

    The Iranian constitution also refuses to officially recognize the Baha’i religion—one of the largest non-Muslim minorities in this country. They label Baha’is as heretics, among other pejorative terms. The Baha’is of this country face extensive limits on work and education.

    The founder of “the Muslim Network for Baha’i Rights” believes that most people in the Arab world know very little about the Baha’is.
    “When I talk to my friends about the Baha’i faith, they tell me that it is a satanic religion. I ask them to provide me with one of the principles of this religion, but they have no answer. Some think that the Baha’is are a sect of Shi’i Islam which is also a mistake. They don’t know anything about it, but they are nonetheless suspicious of its followers.”

    This Bahraini youth is convinced that the most successful societies in the world today are those which—notwithstanding the diversity of religions and ethnic groups within them—are able to preserve their unity and respect the rights of their minorities.


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